VCE Visual Communication Design

(Note: Year 10 acceleration is offered in VCE Visual Communication and Design)

Unit 1: Introduction to Visual Communication Design

This unit focuses on using visual language to communicate messages, ideas and concepts using visualisation, observational and presentation drawing methods. They explore the design elements and principles, investigate design styles and four stages of the design process: research, generation of ideas, development of concepts and refinement of visual communications.
 
Assessment tasks:
  • folio of observational and visualisation drawings
  • final presentations created using manual and digital methods
  • case study supported by written notes and/or visual materials
  • examination

 

1: Drawing as a means of communication.

On completion of this unit the student should be able to create drawings for different purposes using a range of drawing methods, media and materials.

Stephanie Smith                                            Meg Frazer                                                          Christina Russo

 

Areas of study:

  • observational drawing to show form, proportion and surface textures
  • visualisation drawing methods to make design ideas and concepts visible
  • presentation drawing methods using manual and/or digital methods
  • paraline (isometric and planometric) and perspective (one and two point) drawing methods to create three-dimensional forms
  • drawing methods to represent objects two-dimensionally (third-angle orthogonal drawing)
  • rendering techniques for depicting the direction of light, shade and shadow
  • manual and/or digital methods suitable for creating drawing
  • media and materials to support different drawing purposes and drawing methods
  • techniques for generating and reflecting on ideas
 
2. Design elements and design principles

On completion of this unit the student should be able to select and apply design elements and design principles to create visual communications that satisfy stated purposes.

 


Christina Russo                                          Tia Lykokapis                                             Amanda Disilvestro

Areas of study:

  • design elements e.g. point, line, shape, form, tone, texture, colour and type
  • design principles e.g. figure-ground, balance, contrast, cropping, hierarchy, scale, proportion and pattern (repetition and alternation)
  • aesthetic and functional factors that influence their selection and application
  • their use in the generation of ideas and development of concepts in the design process
  • their exploration and application using different manual and digital drawing methods, media and materials
  • purposes of visual communications e.g. to guide, inform, teach, promote, advertise, identify and depict
  • drawing methods to visualise ideas and concepts
  • techniques for generating and reflecting on ideas
  • copyright obligations when using the work of others in visual communications
 
3. Visual communication design in context
 

On completion of this unit the student should be able to describe how visual communications in a design field have been influenced by past and contemporary practices and by social and cultural factors.

Areas of study:

  • social and cultural factors that influence the design of visual communications
  • factors that influence visual communication practices, e.g. technology, economics and environmental considerations
  • design styles of past and contemporary key designers
  • ways in which manual and digital methods, media, materials, design elements and design principles are influenced by past and contemporary practices and cultural and social factors
  • appropriate terminology

 A student’s perspective

VCD this year has been really fun and I have learnt a lot! As a year 10 doing year 11 Vis Com, I’ll admit that I was a little scared at first and didn’t know what to expect, but I soon found that there was nothing to worry about. The teacher does not expect you to know everything about Visual Communication and Design straight away, in fact, it is not like that at all. I have learnt a lot about drawing so far this year as we have done many things such as observational drawings and learning to render objects in different materials. We created an unusual creature of different textures using ‘photoshop’ on the computer and then drew it by hand, so that we could learn the properties and specific details of many different textures – working on our observational skills. We also had the opportunity to create a poster using ‘illustrator’ on the computer for this year’s creative arts festival. Next semester we are going to do more computer work and continue to learn about programs such as ‘photoshop’ and ‘illustrator’. I have loved coming to class this year and would definitely recommend it to anyone who is interested in things like drawing and graphic design. Erin Flatters 11VCD

 
 
 
Unit 2: Applications of visual communication within design fields
 

This unit focuses on the application of visual communication design knowledge, design thinking and drawing methods to create visual communications to meet specific purposes in designated design fields. They apply design thinking skills when exploring ways in which images and type can be manipulated to communicate ideas and concepts in different ways. Students develop an understanding of the design process to solve design problems and present ideas. In response to a brief, students engage in the stages of research, generation of ideas and development and refinement of concepts to create visual communications.

1. Technical drawing in context

On completion of this unit the student should be able to create drawings for different purposes using a range of drawing methods, media and materials.

Areas of study:

  • understand target audiences, purposes and contexts of presentation drawings associated with a selected field
  • two-dimensional drawing methods e.g. plans and elevations (environmental) and third-angle orthogonal projections (industrial)
  • rendering techniques for depicting the direction of light, shade and shadow and for representing surfaces, materials, texture and form
  • methods used to refine drawings using manual and digital methods
  • measures for evaluating effective drawings e.g. readability, clarity, accuracy, communication of message, usability and relevance
  • technical drawing conventions used with presentation drawings e.g. those related to layout, dimensions, labels, symbols and lines
  • role of the Australian Standards in providing nationally accepted conventions for technical drawing
  • methods of drawing to scale using conventional rations e.g.:
    • 1:50, 1:100 or 1:25 (environmental)
    • 1:1, 2:1, 1:5 or 1:10 (industrial)

 

 

Amelia Dentesano                                                                                                 Tamanna Kaul

2. Type and image in context

On completion of this unit the student should be able to manipulate type and images to create visual communications suitable for print and screen-based presentations, taking into account copyright.

Areas of study:

  • features of key historical and contemporary typography
  • techniques for analysing the relationship between type and imagery
  • terminology to describe the characteristics of the typeface
  • image size and file formats suitable for print and screen-based presentations
  • print and screen-based final presentation formats e.g. web pages, posters, packaging, magazines and banners for meeting different communication purposes
  • typographic and layout conventions that assist with readability and legibility
  • design thinking techniques for generating ideas and reflecting on options
  • materials, media, design elements, design principles, and manual and digital methods e.g. drawing, painting, printing, digital photography, photography, collage, and three-dimensional process for visualising different ideas and concepts
  • a range of digital design technologies and their capabilities such as a digital camera capturing images with a specified pixel resolution and software that tracks and adjusts kerning of type
  • techniques for digitally manipulating type and images to convey particular moods or emotions
  • copyright obligations when using typeface designs and images created by others

Sarah Dennis                                                       Ashlynn Heaton

3. Applying the design process

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply stages of the design process to create a visual communication appropriate to a given brief.

Areas of study:

  • the role of the brief in establishing the parameters of a design task
  • purposes of visual communications in relation to specified target audiences and contexts
  • the design process as a framework for organising and implementing design decisions
  • research and analysis for inspiration and to generate design ideas and concepts
  • drawing methods to visualise ideas and concepts
  • suitability of different manual and digital methods, media and materials for visualising ideas and developing concepts
  • key features and functions of design elements and design principles
  • techniques for refining and presenting visual communications using manual and digital methods
  • design thinking techniques: creative, critical and reflective
  • trademark and copyright legal obligations of designers when using the work of others
  • appropriate terminology
  Jessica Webb
         Amanda Disilvestro
  Tia Lykokapis
 
Unit 3: Visual communication design practices
 
This unit focuses on an understanding of the process designers employ to structure their thinking and communicate ideas with clients, target audiences, other designers and specialists. Through practical investigation and analysis of existing visual communications, students gain insight into how the selection of methods, media and materials, and the application of design elements and design principles, can create effective visual communications for specific audiences and purposes. Students use their research and analysis of the process of visual communication designers to support the development of their own designs. They establish a brief for a client and apply design thinking through the design process. Students use observational and visualisation drawings to generate a wide range of design ideas and apply design thinking strategies to organise the evaluate their ideas.
 
Assessment tasks:
Outcome 1
  • three visual communication designs for different contexts, purposes and audiences
  • analysis of the connections between the three visual communications and the stimulus material

Outcome 2

  • short responses to structured questions
 
1. Analysis and practice in context

On completion of this unit the student should be able to  create visual communications for specific contexts, purposes and audiences that are informed by their analysis of existing visual communications in the three design fields.

  • communication – the design and presentation of visual information to convey ideas and concepts
  • environmental – the design and presentation of visual information for built/constructed environments
  • industrial – the design and presentation of visual information for manufactured products
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       Kate Napoli                                           Brooke Grebert-Craig
 
Areas of study:
  • key design features of existing visual communications associated with the communication, environmental and industrial design fields
  • techniques for analysing visual communications
  • connections between existing and created visual communications
  • characteristics of audiences that influence visual communications
  • location, socioeconomic status and cultural background
  • purposes of visual communications, including to advertise, promote, depict, teach, inform, identify and guide
  • techniques for gaining attention and maintaining engagement of audiences using visual language
  • characteristics and functions of design elements and design principles
  • drawing methods to visualise ideas and concepts
  • two-dimensional (orthogonal, plans and elevations and packaging nets) and three-dimensional (perspective: one and two point) and paraline (isometric and planometric) drawing methods to represent forms
  • methods of converting two-dimensional representation to three-dimensional drawing and the reverse
  • technical drawing conventions appropriate for specified purposes, including layout, dimensions, labels, symbols and lines
  • techniques for creating visual communications using manual and digital methods
  • methods, materials and media used for different visual communications
  • key characteristics and functions of typography conventions including kerning, tracking and leading
  • appropriate terminology

2. Design industry practice

On completion of this unit the student should be able to discuss the practices of a contemporary designer from each of the design fields and explain factors that influence these practices.

Areas of study:

  • key stages of the design process used by visual communication designers
  • the roles and responsibilities of designers, specialists and clients and the processes and practices used to collaborate
  • the distinguishing characteristics of different design fields
  • the role of the brief in documenting the parameters of clients’ needs
  • evaluation techniques employed by designers
  • decisions made during the design and production of visual communications to fulfil a brief, including the choice of materials, methods, media, design elements and design principles
  • ]trademark and copyright legal obligations of designers when using the work of others
  • appropriate terminology
 
3. Developing a brief and generating ideas
 
On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply design thinking in preparing a brief with two communication needs for a client, undertaking research and generating a range of ideas relevant to the brief.
 

Erin Flatters

Areas of study:

  • key design thinking that underpins the application of the design process
  • the role of the design process in the creation of visual communications
  • the contents of a brief and its role in guiding the development of visual communications
  • the constraints, context, purposes and audience characteristics that influence visual communications
  • the role of research to seek inspiration for ideas
  • methods to support the recording of ideas, including visualisation drawings (two and three-dimensional), sketches and annotations
  • rendering techniques to show form, surface texture, light, shade and shadow
  • key features and functions of design elements and design principles
  • trademark and copyright legal obligations of designers when using the work of others
  • appropriate terminology

A student’s perspective:

Visual communication and design is the perfect mix of free hand drawing and computer work. It has given me a broader understanding of computer applications as well as how professionals work in the field and I have seen a vast improvement in my drawings.  I highly recommend VCD to those who are interested in areas such as architecture, interior design, product design, graphic design and are looking for a creative outlet for their ideas.

Year 12 Student 

 

Gallery of Student Artworks

Emma Pugliese                                      Stephanie Berlangieri            Christina D’Souza
Annabel Robson                                           Amanda Disilvestro                                                      Monica Hunt
 
Unit 4: Visual communication design, development, evaluation and presentation
 

This unit is on the development of design concepts and two final presentations of visual communications to meet the requirements of the brief. this involves applying the design process twice to meet each of the stated communication needs. Having completed their brief and generated ideas in Unit 3, students continue the design process by developing and refining concepts for each communication need stated in the brief.

Assessment tasks:

Unit 3 – Outcome 3

A brief that identifies the contexts, constraints, client’s needs and target audience, and a folio generating ideas relevant to the brief. The development folio for each need will include:

  • use of design process and design thinking strategies
  • annotated research for information and inspiration
  • observational and visualisation drawings
  • generation of a wide range of design ideas

Unit 4 – Outcome 1

A folio of conceptual developments for each need which will include:

  • use of design process and design thinking strategies
  • application of manual and digital methods, media, materials, design elements, design principles, presentation formats
  • development and refinement of concepts
  • construction and presentation of a pitch to an audience
  • reasons for selection of preferred concepts for each need

Unit 4 – Outcome 2

Two distinct final presentations in two separate presentation formats that fulfil the communication needs of the client as detailed in the brief. Evaluate how each presentation satisfies the requirements of the brief and evaluate the design process used to produce the final visual communications.

 
1. Development refinement and evaluation
 

On completion of this unit the student should be able to develop distinctly different  concepts for each communication need and devise a pitch to present concepts to an audience, evaluating the extent to which these concepts meet the requirements of the brief.

Areas of study:

  • design thinking techniques that underpin the application of the design process
  • the role of the brief in the development and evaluation of visual communications
  • methods for visualising ideas and developing concepts
  • techniques for gaining attention and maintaining engagement of target audiences, using visual and written language
  • mock-ups as a method of testing the suitability of concepts
  • purposes and methods of delivering a pitch to present and explain resolutions to a brief
  • the use of the design process as a framework for creating visual communications
  • techniques for recording decision making including annotation
  • appropriate terminology
12VCD_Anastasia Abeywardana
12VCD_Anastasia Abeywardana
Ruby Robertson Yr 12 VCD
Ruby Robertson Yr 12 VCD
2. Final presentations
 

On completion of this unit the student should be able to produce a final visual communication presentation for each communication need that satisfies the requirements of the brief.

Areas of study:

  • specific presentation formats to communicate design intentions for two different communication needs
  • ways of presenting distinctive final visual communications that meet the requirements of a brief
  • techniques for gaining attention and maintaining engagement of target audiences using visual language
  • methods, materials, media, design elements, design principles and relevant conventions to produce final visual communications
12VCD_Pauline Maderazo
12VCD_Pauline Maderazo
Career Pathways

This subject is useful for careers in fields such as  Graphic Design, Multi-Media Design, Advertising/Marketing, Architecture, Interior Design or Industrial Design.

See the below link for further information for career and future training options.

https://www.myfuture.edu.au/bullseyes/details?id=23#/

https://www.myfuture.edu.au/bullseyes/details?id=20#/

 

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