Year 10 Electives | History.

 

 
 

History | The Modern World and Australia

ELECTIVE | HISTORY

The Modern World and Australia

In this course of study, students explore the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context.  The twentieth century became a critical period in Australia’s social, cultural, economic and political development. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international co-operation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia’s development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region, and its global standing. The history content at this year level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Historical  Concepts and Skills.

Topics for study may include:

  • World War II
  • the movement towards Aboriginal Rights and Freedoms
  • the impact of Globalisation.

     

       
       

       
       

      History | Our Australia

      ELECTIVE | HISTORY (BY INVITATION ONLY)

      Our Australia

      This Humanities unit of study is offered by invitation to support the development of students’ literacy needs.  It is completed as alternative to mainstream History at Year 10.  Assessment tasks are designed to reflect students’ individual needs.

      This subject explores Our Australia and investigates the Australian Identity, Australia and its place in Asia, Australia’s role in World War 2, the way in which we are governed and the rights and responsibilities of individuals within Australia.

       

        Assessment

        There is a focus on exploring the interests of the student and there is no formal end of unit examination.

         
         

         
         

        History | 20th Century History *Unit 1

        ELECTIVE | HISTORY - 20 CENTURY HISTORY (*Unit 1) *VCE

        Unit 1 can be taken in Year 10 in lieu of Year 10 Core History.

        NOTE:  It is strongly suggested that if you are intending to study either Revolutions or Australian and Global Politics at Year 12, that you have satisfactorily completed a semester of History or Australian and Global Politics at Year 10 or 11.

        Unit 1: Twentieth Century History 1918–1939

        In Unit 1 students explore the nature of political, social and cultural change in the period between the world wars. The period after World War One was characterised by significant social and cultural change in the contrasting decades of the 1920s and 1930s. New fascist governments used the military, education and propaganda to impose controls on the way people lived, to exclude particular groups of people and to silence criticism. In Germany, the persecution of the Jewish people became intensified. In the USSR, millions of people were forced to work in state-owned factories and farms and had limited personal freedom. Japan became increasingly militarised and anti-western. In the USA, the consumerism and material progress of the 1920s was tempered by the Great Crash of 1929. Writers, artists, musicians, choreographers and filmmakers reflected, promoted or resisted political, economic and social changes.

        Area of Study 1: Ideology and conflict

        In this area of study students explore the events, ideologies and movements of the period after World War One; the emergence of conflict; and the causes of World War Two. They investigate the impact of the treaties which ended the Great War and which redrew the map of Europe and broke up the former empires of the defeated nations. They consider the aims, achievements and limitations of the League of Nations. While democratic governments initially replaced the monarchies and authoritarian forms of government in European countries at the end of the war, new ideologies of socialism, communism and fascism gained popular support. Economic instability, territorial aggression and totalitarianism combined to draw the world into a second major conflict in 1939.

        Outcome 1
        On completion of this unit the student should be able to explain the consequences of the peace treaties which ended World War One, the impact of ideologies on nations and the events that led to World War Two.

           

          Area of Study 2: Social and cultural change

          In this area of study students focus on the social life and cultural expression in the 1920s and 1930s and their relation to the technological, political and economic changes of the period. Students explore particular forms of cultural expression from the period in one or more of the following contexts: Italy, Germany, Japan, USSR and/or USA.

          The period between the wars was characterised by significant social and cultural change.

          The creative arts both reflected and challenged social life and change in this period where mass entertainment and information by means of radio and film became widespread.

          Outcome 2
          On completion of this unit the student should be able to explain patterns of social life and cultural change in one or more contexts, and analyse the factors which influenced changes to social life and culture, in the inter-war years.

          Assessment

          Assessment tasks will include:

          • a historical inquiry
          • an analysis of primary sources
          • an essay
          • an examination
           
           

           
           

          History | Australian & Global Politics *Unit 1

          ELECTIVE | HISTORY - Australian & global politics (*Unit 1) *VCE

          Unit 1 can be taken in Year 10 in lieu of Year 10 Core History.

          NOTE:  It is strongly suggested that if you are intending to study either Revolutions or Australian and Global Politics at Year 12, that you have satisfactorily completed a semester of History or Australian and Global Politics at Year 10 or 11.

          Unit 1: Ideas, Actors & Power

          Area of Study 1: Power and ideas

          This area of study provides students with a general introduction to the concept and significance of politics, power, authority and legitimacy. Students are introduced to the political spectrum: left, right, radical, conservative. They explore ideas that shape political systems including liberal democracy, socialism, fascism, authoritarianism and theocracy. Students examine the characteristics of the Australian political system and investigate a case study of a non-democratic system to compare the ways that political systems operate and to develop a deeper understanding of Australian democracy.

          Area of Study 2: Political actors and power

          In this area of study students explore the roles and functions of key political actors in the Australian system. Students investigate the role of political parties, who can shape the political agenda, interest groups, who seek to influence the government of the day, and the media, who report and interpret Australian politics. Students investigate case studies of political parties, interest groups and media issues to analyse the importance of these forms of participation in the Australian political system

          Outcomes

          On completion of this unit students should be able to:
          identify and explain key ideas relating to the exercise of political power, and analyse and evaluate different approaches to governmental power by comparing Australian democracy with a non-democratic political system.
          explain and analyse the roles and functions of political parties, interest groups and the media and their influence on participation in Australian politics.

          Assessment

          Assessment tasks will include:

          • Research report
          • Analytical essay
          • Short answer test and Examination
          • Analysis of written documents